Why Fly United?

If you were to sit down right now and list three things that bring you energy and three things that drain your energy, what would they be? For purposes of this post, I am going to share my hands down number 1 thing that drains my energy and that is being around negative people.

We all have choices in life, so why not focus on what you can do to achieve a positive outcome rather than dwell on the negative? In saying this, I am going to share my United Airlines experience and while it may seem like I am focused on the negative, I am actually sharing a personal experience, which happens to be negative, in order to provide a positive solution that could be a win for the company, for a cause and for the community.

Apparently Customers Want to Be Treated Equally… So They Tell Me

Apparently Customers Want to Be Treated Equally… So They Tell Me

Last week my colleague, Jocelyn Chipman, shared a story about her experience when online shopping. Amazon.com went the extra mile to wow her. But what about the in-person experience? What do consumers expect when they are experiencing face-to-face customer service? For these answers, I went to Dallas-Fort Worth airport — the world’s ninth-busiest airport in the world when it comes to passenger traffic — and asked some travelers.

Getting to the WOW factor

It is funny how many different explanations there are for a great experience. Some call it a “wow” factor, which covers a lot of ground and really depends on how the customer is feeling at that moment. I know for myself, little acts of surprise can bring a smile to my face, but only if it is relevant. How we make someone feel is really the WOW factor, the little gestures, the caring, empathy and yes doing some “extra” thing that demonstrates that you know the customer or are interested in getting to know the customer.

When Being a Number Means Everything

When Being a Number Means Everything

On May 10, 2014, I ran in the 10th annual Fargo Marathon. As one of 24,000 participants running in this year’s event, I was proud to wear my number (bib). After all, there was only one of me, and my bib was just as important as every other bib out there. You can get a sense of the enormity of this event by watching the this video.

If you haven’t had the pleasure of participating in a large-scale race like this one, let me tell you you are missing out! The 32-person race committee is focused on the experience of each of the 24,000 participants and their families in the 363 days leading up to the race weekend.